Resolutions of Council


3/24/2020 CFLCA BOD Asks City for More Stringent Measures RE: COVID-19

March 24, 2020

Dear Honorable Mayor, City Commissioners and City Manager Lagerbloom,

Enclosed please find the CFLCA Board motion approved last night, which supports more stringent measures be taken by the City of Fort Lauderdale in response to COVID-19.

Thank you for your public service and please do not hesitate to contact CFLCA with any questions.

Respectfully,

Colleen Lockwood

President, CFLCA

VIEW THE 3.24.20 CFLCA Board Motion on COVID-19 HERE


CFLCA General Membership Unanimously Opposes SB1228/HB1001- Jan. 2020

Date: February 10th, 2020
From: Colleen Lockwood, President CFLCA
VIA Email To: Honorable Florida Senate and House Members
CC: Honorable Fort Lauderdale Mayor & City Commissioners, Fort Lauderdale City
Manager Lagerbloom, [email protected]
Re: SB 1128 and companion HB 1011

The Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations, Inc. (“CFLCA”) is a coalition primarily of Civic and
Homeowner Associations recognized by the City of Fort Lauderdale. The CFLCA maintains a “focus on
the issues relating to preservation of the present and future welfare of the City of Fort Lauderdale and its
neighborhoods and citizens, be proactive and reactive to those issues, communicate any recommendations
to the proper authorities, strive to ever improve communication and create a stronger partnership between
City Government and the neighborhoods.”

On January 14th, 2020 the CFLCA held a General Meeting at the Fort Lauderdale City Hall. Quorum
requirements were met.

SB 1128 (Diaz) and HB 1011: “Vacation Rentals; Preempting the regulation of vacation rentals to the
state; prohibiting a local law, ordinance, or regulation from allowing or requiring inspections or licensing
of vacation rentals, etc.” was discussed in the company of Fort Lauderdale City Manager Chris
Lagerbloom. Upon close of the discussion and after a vote it was established that:

The CFLCA unanimously opposes SB 1128 and companion HB 1011.

The following thirty (30) neighborhood associations had a representative in attendance when the vote was
taken and opposed SB1128/HB1011: Bal Harbour H.O.A., Bermuda Riviera Association, Central Beach
Alliance, Colee Hammock H.O.A., Coral Ridge Association, Downtown Fort Lauderdale Civic
Association, Edgewood Civic Association, Harbordale Civic Association, Harbour Inlet Association,
Home Beautiful Park Civic Association, Imperial Point Civic Association, Inc., Lauderdale Beach H.O.A.,
Lauderdale Harbors Improvement Association, Lauderdale Isle Civic Association, Lauderdale Manors
H.O.A., Melrose Manors H.O.A., Middle River Terrace Neighborhood Association, Nurmi Isles H.O.A.,
Inc., Progresso Village, Rio Vista Civic Association, Inc., Riverland Preservation Society, River Oaks
Civic Association, Riverside Park Residents Association, Rock Island Community, Sailboat Bend Civic
Association, Shady Banks Civic Association, Sunrise Intracoastal H.O.A., South Middle River Civic
Association, Tarpon River Civic Association, Victoria Park Civic Association.

We commend all those who have voted in opposition to this legislation and applaud continued efforts to
amend existing language to maintain current local ordinances, protecting the ability of local municipalities
to regulate vacation rentals. Regulation by local government rather than via statewide law best serves the
needs of our neighborhoods and its citizens. The grandfathered in regulations passed by cities and counties
before 2011 do not reflect today’s short-term vacation rental issues, and warrant further review.

Respectfully,
Colleen Lockwood
President, Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations

 

SB1128 Opposition Statement 2.10.2020 CFLCA


CFLCA General Membership Supports “Hybrid Methodology”- Jan. 2020

Date: February 10th, 2020
From: Colleen Lockwood, President CFLCA
VIA Email To: Fort Lauderdale Mayor & City Commission Members, Fort Lauderdale City
Manager Lagerbloom

On January 14th, 2020 the CFLCA held a General Meeting at the Fort Lauderdale City Hall. Quorum
requirements were met. In attendance was Kyle Stevens, Managing Consultant, Stantec. Mr. Stevens
provided the General Membership with a presentation on the “Stormwater Rate Study.”

Upon completion of his presentation a question & answer session was conducted. At the close of
discussion and after a vote it was established that: The CFLCA general membership is in support of
the hybrid methodology which will support stormwater system and improvements

The following twenty-six (26) neighborhood associations had a representative in attendance and voted in
support of the hybrid methodology: Bal Harbour H.O.A., Bermuda Riviera Association, Colee Hammock
H.O.A., Coral Ridge Association, Edgewood Civic Association, Harbordale Civic Association, Harbour
Inlet Association, Home Beautiful Park Civic Association, Imperial Point Civic Association, Inc.,
Lauderdale Beach H.O.A., Lauderdale Isle Civic Association, Lauderdale Manors H.O.A., Melrose
Manors H.O.A., Middle River Terrace Neighborhood Association, Nurmi Isles H.O.A., Inc., Progresso
Village, Rio Vista Civic Association, Inc., Riverland Preservation Society, River Oaks Civic Association,
Riverside Park Residents Association, Rock Island Community, Sailboat Bend Civic Association, Shady
Banks Civic Association, Sunrise Intracoastal H.O.A., South Middle River Civic Association, Tarpon
River Civic Association.

The following three (3) associations had a representative in attendance and voted in opposition of the
hybrid methodology: Central Beach Alliance, Downtown Fort Lauderdale Civic Association, and Victoria
Park Civic Association.

Respectfully,
Colleen Lockwood
President, Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations

 

stormwater study Statement 2.10.2020 CFLCA


9.23.2019 CFLCA Board Communication RE: Proposed ILA

CFLCA Position Stmt Suggested Continuing Resp. of TAM 9.23.2019

Date:                           September 24, 2019

Sent on Behalf of:     Colleen Lockwood, CFLCA President

To:                              Fort Lauderdale Mayor, City Commission, City Manager

CC:                             Greg Stuart, Ben Rogers, CFLCA Board of Directors

 Honorable Mayor, Commissioners, City Manager, Mr. Stuart and Mr. Rogers:

On September 23, 2019 the Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations, Inc. (“CFLCA”) held a Board Meeting at the Fort Lauderdale City Hall. Quorum requirements were met and the following Board Members were in attendance: Colleen Lockwood, Stan Eichelbaum, Deborah Rosenbaum, Christina Currie, Mary Peloquin, Marilyn Mammano, Jim Concannon, Michael Albetta, and Kelly Manning.

The matter of the proposed ILA between the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward MPO was again discussed at length as it is a matter of great concern to our members.

Upon close of discussion the CFLCA Board of Directors unanimously voted to make the following request to City Officials.

Now that the proposed ILA between the City of Fort Lauderdale and Broward MPO is on hold pending additional discussion & negotiations the CFLCA Board of Directors respectfully requests that the attached “Suggested Continuing Responsibilities of the Transportation & Mobility Department” be incorporated into the ILA discussion/negotiation.

This request is in addition to the request we made for the following which have yet to be fulfilled:  “that City expeditiously hire a full time dedicated Transportation and Mobility Director for the Transportation and Mobility Department and provide the organizational chart/visual chart referenced in by City Manager Lagerbloom at the August 22nd special meeting to CFLCA President as soon as possible.”

Requested materials and responses to this correspondence should be email directed to Colleen Lockwood, CFLCA President, at [email protected].

Respectfully Submitted,

Christina Currie, CFLCA Secretary

For Colleen Lockwood, CFLCA President

 

Suggested Continuing Responsibilities

of the Transportation & Mobility Department

 

  • Work with neighborhood associations to draft, design and implement neighborhood mobility plans [e.g. Tarpon River]. (Planner, Engineer).

 

  • Respond to concerns about traffic and transportation problems in neighborhoods such as safety concerns, cut through traffic, crosswalks/signal requests, and inadequate signage. Example actions include speed humps, roundabouts, multi-way stops, ‘watch your speed’ signs, (Engineer, Planner).

 

  • Plan and implement new sidewalk requests (Engineer for design and construction, Planner for public consultation and help develop plans).

 

  • Research, write and solicit grants from the MPO and other agencies and organizations. Designs and administers grant funded projects. (Planner with support from engineering.)

 

  • Examine and develop timing plans for signals and coordinates with BCTE to implement. (Engineer).

 

  • Provide City expertise and local knowledge for Corridor (Las Olas Corridor, SE 17th Street Corridor, Convention Center, NE 15th Avenue Median, Bayview Drive, North Beach Village, A1A Corridor, and Davie Boulevard) and Development of Regional Impact (DRI)). [Engineer, Planner].

 

  • Provide City expertise and local knowledge on FDOT, BC and similar agency proposals that impact the City. Leverages enhancements to benefit City. [Engineer, Planner].

 

  • Examine transportation and traffic effects of proposed developments/redevelopments and encourages improvements. Review and improve Maintenance of Traffic Plans (MOTs). [Engineer].

 

  • Examine and analyze impacts of emerging transportation technologies (e.g. scooters, autonomous vehicles (AV), ridesharing) and proposes infrastructure changes. [Engineer, Planner].

 

 


CFLCA Board Position Statements Issued to Commission 9/10/2019

CFLCA Board of Director’s voted in favor of issuing 2 statements to the Commission.  The 1st relates to the Proposed ILA with the City & Broward MPO and supports the ILA, with 2 conditions.  The 2nd relates to tree preservation and urges the City to create a stronger tree preservation ordinance.  View the statements below:

CFLCA Position on TAM_MPO

CFLCA Position on Tree Ordinance


CFLCA Voted to Regulate Sober Homes

At the August 8 2017 General Membership Meeting The following resolution passed unanimously

“The Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations requests that the Commission instruct the City Manager to prepare a draft ordinance to regulate Sober Homes and that the draft ordinance be placed a Commission Conference Agenda for discussion as soon as possible”

You can download the the following letter that was sent to the Commission on August 10.   Sober Homes Letter


Consensus Report on Density

The Consensus Report on Density was adopted at the  May  General Membership Meeting. The Report was prepared by the Comprehensive Planning Committee Chaired by Steve Buckingham, President of Tarpen River Civic Association. It was forwarded to the Mayor and City Commissioners and the City Manager as input to the City Commission Density Workshops. We look forward to discussing the Report with the Commisiners at an upcoming workshop.

CFLCA Consensus Statement on Density

Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations

Consensus Statement to the City Commission on Development/Density

 The Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations believes that the City of Fort Lauderdale should encourage human-scaled neighborhoods over urban sprawl, multiple transportation modes over automobile dependence and orderly, predictable development patterns that balance growth with neighborhood preservation.

We feel strongly that Fort Lauderdale should:

  • Encourage transit-friendly office, commercial and multi-family residential development within high density, mixed-use activity centers (ex: Downtown RAC, S. Andrews Ave/SRAC) surrounded by lower density/single-family neighborhoods, parks and natural amenities.
  • Discourage unsustainable, inappropriately-scaled development on the barrier island.
  • Continue to explore new opportunities for growth in the Uptown district and along the major identified corridors. However, until planning for a predictable and acceptable level of density and design is agreed upon, new large-scale projects should be discouraged or subject to further review.
  • Provide greater incentives for sustainable development that utilizes solar, wind, and other alternative energy sources to power the projects’ needs once built.

With 3 annual Neighbor Surveys pointing to traffic flow/congestion as the single biggest challenge facing the city, increased large-scale development and density should be encouraged only in sections of the city that either presently have the necessary transportation and self-supporting infrastructure (places of employment, shopping, food choices, etc.) in place to mitigate traffic flow issues or in sections of the city where it is planned and financed for the immediate future. For example, the Council would be generally supportive of density development along the phase 1 route of the Wave Modern Streetcar as it would be conducive to place more housing where residents have public transportation options. We also strongly support more transit options to airport, beach and the port to reduce car trips.

Further, we believe that growth and neighborhood strengthening can be accomplished by committing to the following:

  1. We advocate an acceleration of improving neighborhood streets deemed critical for the movement of people by all methods of transportation; specifically sidewalks, bike lanes, crosswalks, lighting, street striping, and details outlined in “Complete Streets” and “Connecting the Blocks”.   We would not be supportive of large-scale residential construction moving forward in any neighborhood unless these aspects of planning are either in place or planned and financed in part or wholly by the developer.
  1. We support promoting distinctive, attractive neighborhoods and local business districts with a strong sense of place, including the rehabilitation, re-use, and protection of structures of importance; specifically, we support emphasizing and protecting existing community assets such as community centers, existing or planned parks, waterway access points and vistas, historic structures, etc.
  1. We support responsible, compatible growth in existing neighborhoods. For example, more needs to be done to preserve the general character of established neighborhoods that have developed over time. In-fill residential development (i.e., duplexes, cluster dwellings, etc.) has often become out of character with the pre-existing built environment and we request a review and modification of height and bulk allowances for new construction on existing lots in residential neighborhoods that are mostly composed of older stock, single family homes. Regenerate and implement the recommendations of the ULDR Modifications Plan outlined in the Neighborhood Development Criteria Revisions Project (NDCR).
  1. We want development decisions to be predictable and fair. While the Council supports flexibility from time to time for truly innovative development proposals that will enhance the community, we would prefer that Staff and Citizen Boards either stop or limit exceptions to our building codes and zoning regulations, especially within or nearby highly established and traditional neighborhoods.
  1. Continue to encourage and foster neighborhood participation as early as possible in development and density placement decision-making.